A Nevada conservative group has launched a Spanish-language ad in the battleground state that targets the Obama administration's record number of deportations of undocumented immigrants.

Under President Barack Obama, a record 1.2 million immigrants have been deported.

"Obama has deported more people than any other president in this country's history," the 30-second ad spot entitled 'No More Lies' said. Beginning Wednesday, the advertisement will air for two weeks on television networks Univision and Telefotura in Las Vegas. It is sponsored by Nevada Hispanics, a sub-group of American Principles in Action a 501(c)(4) group. 

The new Nevada ad also attacked Obama for not passing comprehensive immigration reform as promised in 2008.

"Don't be fooled by President Obama's words," the ad says. "Why didn't he keep his promise to push immigration reform?" 

Though the ad was not paid for by the Romney campaign, this particular Nevada ad is a rare attempt by Republicans to use the immigration issue against Obama. Republicans have deliberately targeted the economy, not immigration, as the issue that will sway Latino voters in this election.

The ad makes no mention of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, his immigration policy, or Republicans.

President Obama's immigration enforcement policy has been a source of contention among Latino voters, according to polls.

In a Fox News Latino poll conducted in February, less than half (46 percent) of 1,200 likely Latino voters said they approved of Obama’s handling of the immigration issue, even though the president openly supports the DREAM Act and comprehensive immigration reform.

However, a poll conducted by Latino Decisions in June highlights a potential shift in Latino voter support of the president's immigration policy after his June announcement that his administration will stop deporting young undocumented immigrants and issue temporary work permits.

The Obama campaign and outside supporter groups have outspent the Romney campaign, and his outside supporter groups, by close to 12 to 1 margin for Spanish language advertisements, according to NBC News.

Latinos voters are an increasingly important demographic after Nevada's Hispanic population grew to 26.5 percent in 2010, according to census data. Latino voters represented 9 percent of the electorate in 2010.

Obama can benefit from the political organization Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has built in the state, one that helped Reid fend off a tough challenge two years ago from Tea Party-backed Republican Sharron Angle.

Angle's campaign was seen as doomed after she expressed a hard-line -- some said offensive -- views regarding illegal immigration. Her tone alienated many Latinos who had not considered immigration among their main concerns.

Latinos turned out to the polls in significant numbers -- a factor that was seen as pivotal to Reid's re-election.

Romney hopes to gain supporters by concentrating on the state's struggles economic struggles with an 11.6 percent unemployment rate coupled with a small but cohesive Mormon population present a potential election day payoff. A Mormon, Romney benefited from the support of Latter-day Saints church members during the state's Republican caucuses. Though only 7 percent of the state's population, Mormons participated heavily in the caucuses, and 90 percent went for Romney.

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Bryan Llenas currently serves as a New York-based correspondent for Fox News Channel (FNC) and a reporter for Fox News Latino (FNL). Follow him on Twitter @BryanLlenas

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