It stands to reason that the beginning of the end of the Democrat’s control in Washington would begin with the word “sink,” as in candidate Alex Sink, who lost what some might consider the first volley of the midterm elections in Florida this week to Republican David Jolly.

Webster defines “sink” as "to go down," which is what’s likely to happen to the total number of Democrats in Congress this next go-around.  

Jolly, the newly elected representative, narrowly defeated Sink, a Democratic favorite, to replace the late Bill Young’s seat in Florida’s 13th congressional district. Young, a Republican, held the seat since 1971.

What you have is a sinking feeling in the collective stomachs of Nancy Pelosi and her Democratic colleagues. More to the point, if they’re not feeling that pain — then, they’re not really paying attention.

- Rick Sanchez

A narrow defeat is still a defeat; one that sends shivers down the backs of Democrats across the nation who already fear a thumping in the 2014 midterm congressional elections, evidenced by President Obama’s warning of a throwback to 2010.

Blame Obamacare

Last week, Obama said, “People tune out, and because the electorate has changed we get walloped.” The president is also warning that the era of divided government is likely to continue past the upcoming midterms.

If the pattern becomes a trend, Democrats have more to blame than “tune out.” They real culprit may be Obamacare, which Republicans are quick to point out nationally.

“A loud warning for other Democrats running coast to coast," said National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore.

Republican National Convention Chairman Reince Priebus was even more direct, congratulating Pinellas County citizens for electing Jolly, who “will fight for good jobs and quality health care and against Democrats’ effort to rob Medicare Advantage to pay for Obamacare.”

GOP Retains House     

It’s not just Obamacare. There’s yet another trend line that is working in the GOP’s favor when it comes to making gains in Congress. It’s the current tendency for voters to cast ballots for the party already in power.

In fact, it’s happened in every one of the nine special elections held between 2013 and 2014 as part of this Congress. Not a single special election brought about a shift in party affiliation. No wins, no losses, just washes. If that trend continues, there’s little doubt that Republicans will retain control of the house.

Senate Trending Toward GOP  

As for the Senate, the climb is steeper, but imminently doable. All the GOP needs is six seats. The numbers game looks like this: Democrats now hold 21 of the 35 seats up for election. That leaves a lot of room for error. And seven of those 21 are in states that were won by Mitt Romney.

Throw in the disenchantment, if not the downright venom that is Obamacare to those who will be driven to polls in an effort to vote against it — and what you have is a sinking feeling in the collective stomachs of Nancy Pelosi and her Democratic colleagues. More to the point, if they’re not feeling that pain — then, they’re not really paying attention.

Rick Sanchez is a contributor for Fox News Latino.

 

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