The two members of feminist punk rock group Pussy Riot jailed on a conviction for hooliganism arising from an anti-government protest at a Moscow cathedral were released Monday under a general amnesty marking the 20th anniversary of Russia's post-Communist constitution.

Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova had about two months left of their two-year sentences.

A third Pussy Riot member convicted for the February 2012 incident, Yekaterina Samutsevich, got her sentence suspended on appeal.

Alyokhina, 25, said the amnesty was a "a profanity, because it sets free less than 10 percent of prisoners."

"If I had the slightest possibility to reject this mercy, by all means I wouldn't have accepted it," she told TV Rain after walking out of a corrective labor colony in the central Russian region of Nizhny Novgorod.

The 24-year-old Tolokonnikova was released a few hours later from a prison hospital in Siberia.

Both women, who were included in the amnesty by virtue of their status as the mothers of young children, said they plan to devote themselves to human rights struggles.

"Primarily I will be protecting the interests of those people in confinement, people with whom I served my term in colonies," Tolokonnikova told Itar-Tass news agency.

The Pussy Riot members were convicted of "hooliganism motivated by religious hate" after they performed their self-proclaimed punk prayer at Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior.

The prayer included an exhortation to the Virgin Mary to drive out Putin.

Also benefiting from the amnesty are 30 Greenpeace activists who staged a protest against Russian oil drilling in the Arctic, while former oil tycoon and Putin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky was freed last Friday after receiving a pardon.

The erstwhile Yukos CEO spent 10 years in prison and was due for release in October 2014, although prosecutors were reportedly pursuing further charges against him.

Khodorkovsky left Russia on Friday to join his ailing mother in Germany. EFE