Tragedy struck a New York City family when a 12-year old girl took her own life after being bullied by classmates both on and offline.

The body of Gabrielle Molina was found Wednesday by her 15-year old sister, Georgia, hanging in their shared bedroom of their Queens Village home. The troubled girl left a suicide note apologizing to her family and recounting the torture she received at the hands of bullies at Jean Nuzzi Intermediate School 109.

New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said police are investigating.

“There was information in the suicide note concerning cyberbullying,” Kelly said. “Detectives have taken two computers from the home and they will shortly be analyzed. It's a terrible tragedy.”

Molina’s family allegedly knew that she was having trouble with classmates – even getting into a fist fight with another girl – but did not know the extent of the problem until the suicide note was found.

“They called her a slut and a whore. All this she wrote in her journal. I just found out. I didn't touch her journal before (the suicide). That's personal,” said the mother, Glenda Molina, according to the New York Daily News.

“Her sister knew. She said, ‘Mom, she asked me to keep it secret,’” she added.

Molina stayed home from school Wednesday and had locked the door of the bedroom she shared with her sister. When Georgia Molina returned home from school, she and her grandmother forced the door open to discover the gruesome scene.

Upon hearing the news, Glenda rushed home from work at her job as a nurse’s aide.

“I wasn’t there. I was at work when I got the call. My sister-in-law said, ‘Come quick! Gabby is ...’” she told the News, before breaking off her sentence in grief.

Classmates and teachers give varying accounts of Molina. Some describe her as an excellent student who was outwardly positive, while other claim she cut herself and faced both problems in school and at home.

“(Gabby) said that she wanted to move schools because she felt uncomfortable. People wanted to jump her and people bothered her,” schoolmate Samantha Martin said. “She used to cut herself. People knew she was cutting herself.”

Cyberbullying – and tragedies linked to them – are on the rise nationwide.

Last year, Staten Island high schooler Amanda Cummings threw herself in front of a bus after being incessantly bullied for everything from her hair to her failures with boyfriends.

The National Crime Prevention Council says 43 percent of teens are subject to cyberbullying.

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