A full transcript of the diary of Ernesto “Che” Guevara is now online. The 259-page document in Spanish includes some facsimiles with the actual pages of the diary, which was penned in blue ink from January to October 1967.

Guevara's writings were turned over to Cuba, which published them in 1968.

"The goal is for a historical document to be within everyone's reach. And the Internet makes it possible for everyone to know what happened 45 years ago," said Bolivian researcher Carlos Soria Galvarro, who created the site.

The goal is for a historical document to be within everyone's reach. And the Internet makes it possible for everyone to know what happened 45 years ago.

- Bolivian researcher Carlos Soria Galvarro

The Bolivian government had circulated manuscript copies of Che's diary in October 2009, with a limited edition of 1,000 copies.

The online version also includes a complete history of the Journal, the "Necessary Introduction" written by Fidel Castro and many explanatory notes that help understand events and situations of the time.

Soria underscores the fact that his digital transcription amends several errors and alterations that had been dragging and accumulating since the first edition of 1968.

"Among those errors, for example, is when on March 31 the rebels complain of being 'broken', when in the original it says they are 'rotten,'" said the Bolivian journalist, who has to his credit five books on the history of the guerrilla in Bolivia.

Soria Galvarro accessed the original diary in the late '90s, when Bolivia recovered the document after a British firm tried to auction it. Since then, it’s been kept in the vaults of the Central Bank of Bolivia.

Guevara, the controversial Argentine revolutionary who gained worldwide fame fighting alongside Fidel Castro in the Cuban Revolution, was killed October 8, 1967 by Bolivian troops.

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