For archaeologists, discoveries don't come much more delicious than this: a 1,000 year old  kitchen which dates back to the glory days of the Mayan Kabah archaeological area in Yucatán. 

Measuring approximately 40 metres long and 14 metres wide, the kitchen was part of a palace complex. Scientists date it at 750-950 AD, a period when the Mayan city of Kabah was in its prime. Evidence of human habitation at the site go back to as early as 300 BC.

According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), a large number of pots and other artifacts were found in the area. The archaeologists also found evidence of fires.

We think large quantities of food were cooked in palaces, which is why utensils were larger, there were more of them and they had varied shapes for different uses.

- archaeologist Lourdes Toscano

'We think large quantities of food were cooked in palaces, which is why utensils were larger, there were more of them and they had varied shapes for different uses,' said archaeologist Lourdes Toscano said to the German wire service DPA.

Toscano also noted the absence of bones at the site. This leads the experts to suspect that the royal kitchen trash was disposed of somewhere else. 

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