Catch him if you can!

A tiny Chihuahua born without two front legs is now enjoying the wonders of puppy life on a pair of creative wheels made from a Fisher Price toy helicopter.

The disabled pup -named Turbo - was left to the care of The Downtown Veterinarian by a local Indianapolis couple earlier this month. The couple, according to WRTV, had driven to other veterinary offices looking for help for their one-month-old Chihuahua but other clinics had told them they could not help him.

Turbo only weighed 10 ounces and the couple, desperate to get their little guy the best care, did not want to see him euthanized.

Desperate, the couple reached out to the folks at The Downtown Veterinarian.

"A small dog can do well with a cart. So, unless he had another medical condition, there was no way we were putting him to sleep," practice manager Amy Birk at The Downtown Veterinarian told WRTV in Indianapolis. "He's very much a typical Chihuahua. He's rowdy and loves to play and will attack your shoe."

The couple told Birk their Chihuahua had given birth to Turbo. But when they tried to wean him from his mother, the other puppies kept preventing him from eating -- which is why Turbo weighed an airy 10 ounces. The couple gave Turbo to the vet and he was in good physical condition, despite the genetic defect.

Chihuahuas can do well with carts but, because of their small size, they normally cannot be outfitted with regular carts until they're six months old. So Birk's team got creative.

The team built him a makeshift cart using wheels from a Fisher Price Helicopter, pipes from a toy-welding kit, and a Ferret harness.

The office has been doing physical therapy with Turbo everyday to get him adjusted to his temporary new wheels. The staff also named the pup Turbo, though some call him Roo because he resembles a Kangaroo.

"We just wanted him to be able to get used to the feeling of a cart," Birk told Mashable. "It allows him to get up and use his legs a few minutes a day in addition to his physical therapy. Using toys just seemed logical because he is so small and it had to be very light."

Turbo now weighs one pound and is up for adoption.

"These types of dogs need a lot more care than other dogs," Birk told Today. "He's got to go to a home that understands what his needs are."