British writer Doris Lessing, hailed as one of the most influential writers of the past century, died on Sunday, her family said. She was 94.

The author of more than 50 novels, during her career Lessing was presented with numerous awards, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2007, Spain's Prince of Asturias Award in 2001 and the Premi Internacional de Catalunya in 1999.

Lessing died "peacefully" on Sunday morning at her London home, Jonathan Clowes, her lifelong agent and friend, said, although the cause of death has not been revealed.

Before the official confirmation of Lessing's death, which was later made public by The Guardian, the news had been moving on the social networks.

Known above all for "The Golden Notebook" (1962), in which she analyzes the personality and feminine creativity, Lessing's oeuvre is broad and touches on varied themes ranging from the question of identity in foreign cultures to the threshold of madness.

At age 88, the Briton became the oldest female writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, when she was selected for the award over the then-favorite candidate, U.S. author Philip Roth, and she learned the news from the reporters who were waiting at the door of her home.

Her other books include "The Good Terrorist" (1985), "The Fifth Child" (1988) and those she wrote using the pseudonym Jane Somers, including "The Diary of a Good Neighbour" (1985), with the aim of showing the difficulties of getting published facing new writers. EFE