It is an explosive claim that flies in the face of the overwhelming weight of the historical record:  Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun faked their suicides and escaped Berlin in 1945 to begin a new life among the foothills of the Andes.

This is the claim made by British authors Gerrard Williams and Simon Dunstan in the book “Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf,” published by Sterling. 

The authors profess to have ‘overwhelming evidence’ that Hitler died in 1962, at the age of 73, and lived in a wooden chalet in a remote section of Argentina until his death. They also claim that Hitler and Braun had two daughters. The book relies on eyewitness testimony from people who allegedly encountered Hitler and Braun living in Argentina, according to London's Daily Mail.

The sensational claims are being widely panned by historians, including Guy Walters, a leading Nazi historian in Britain who called the book “2,000 percent rubbish.”

“I looked through the book and it’s the biggest pile of crap I’ve ever seen. My mouth just fell open,” Walters told Fox News Latino. “I can’t believe that someone would publish this rubbish. They make claims that supposedly no one has given away in seven decade – you have to be an idiot to believe this. It’s so sad.”

Walters, whose books include “Hunting Evil” and “Berlin Games,” said “Grey Wolf” is based on dodgy sources and questionable material.

"The book is absolute baloney," Walters said. "The publishers and the authors should be ashamed of themselves. They would obviously do anything for money."

The preponderant weight of historical evidence indicates that Hitler died of a self-inflicted gunshot would as Soviet forces advanced on his bunker. He was 56. Braun killed herself by ingesting cyanide.

Though the bodies were never found, it was later learned that Russians took parts of Hitler’s remains to Moscow and the remaining fragments were buried in East Germany, and later destroyed.

The book claims a body double took Hitler’s place and an actress stood in for Braun the day they died. They lived the rest of their life in a Nazi-controlled enclave of Argentina, where thousands of Nazi’s sought refuge after World War II.

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