An archaeological site, which experts say was a Mayan fortress in the Copan Ruins sector of western Honduras, is open to the public now that its restoration has been completed.

The opening ceremony was presided by Honduran Vice President Maria Antonieta Guillen, who said the new site will uncover "more mysteries and more about the history of the Mayan rulers."

The archeological site, located in an area crossed by a geological fault line, is known as Rastrojon, the name given it by settlers in the last 50 years for being a place of stubble and dense weeds, the president of the Copan Ruins Chamber of Commerce and Tourism, Raul Welchez, said.

The fortress at Rastrojon was built some 2 kilometers (1 1/4 miles) from the Copan Ruins, where Mayans carved their history in stone.

From the altitude of the place, the Mayas, who had 16 rulers, had a complete view of the Copan Valley and the city they founded in what is today the like-named western Honduran province on the Guatemalan border.

According to Welchez, geomorphological studies have confirmed the presence at the site of a geological fault line with pronounced depressions, a natural phenomenon of great importance in the religious thought of the Mayas.

The Honduran vice president thanked the representatives of Harvard University and the Rastrojon Copan Archaeological Project, as well as archaeologists Jorge Ramos and William and Barbara Fash, for the project's funding and research. EFE